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NZ judge allows images of man charged in mosque shootings

OLDENBURG, Germany: A German court will deliver the verdict Thursday on the man believed to be the most prolific serial killer in the country’s post-war history, as grieving families face still unanswered questions.Judge Sebastian Buehrmann is expected to hand down a life sentence for around 100 counts of murder to former nurse Niels Hoegel, a…

NZ judge allows images of man charged in mosque shootings

OLDENBURG, Germany: A German court will deliver the verdict Thursday on the man believed to be the most prolific serial killer in the country’s post-war history, as grieving families face still unanswered questions.Judge Sebastian Buehrmann is expected to hand down a life sentence for around 100 counts of murder to former nurse Niels Hoegel, a verdict that generally translates to 15 years in prison in Germany but which can be extended in extreme circumstances.On the final day of the trial on Wednesday, Hoegel asked his victims’ loved ones for forgiveness for his “horrible acts.”“I would like to sincerely apologize for everything I did to you over the course of years,” he said.The heavy-set Hoegel, 42, has already spent a decade in prison following a previous life sentence he received for six other murders.According to the charges against him during this, his third murder trial, Hoegel is accused of killing 97 patients aged between 34 and 96 by medical injection in hospitals in the northern cities of Oldenburg and Delmenhorst.His horrific killing spree is believed to have begun in 2000 and only stopped when he was caught in the act in 2005.Driven by a desire to show off his skills in bringing patients back from the brink of death, Hoegel repeatedly gambled with the lives of vulnerable victims chosen at random.Most often, he lost.The exhumation and autopsy of more than 130 bodies were necessary to build the case for the prosecution.Police suspect that Hoegel’s final toll may be more than 200. But they say they can never know for sure because of gaps in his memory and because many likely victims were cremated before autopsies could be performed.Caught in 2005 while injecting an unprescribed medication into a patient in Delmenhorst, Hoegel was sentenced in 2008 to seven years in prison for attempted murder.A second trial followed in 2014-2015 under pressure from alleged victims’ families.He was found guilty of murder and attempted murder of five other victims and given the maximum sentence of 15 years.At the start of the third trial in October, Buehrmann said its main aim was to establish the full scope of the killing that was allowed to go unchecked for years.“It is like a house with dark rooms — we want to bring light into the darkness,” he said.Victims’ advocates say the court has failed woefully at the task, due in large part to Hoegel’s own contradictory testimony.After admitting on the first day of testimony to killing 100 patients in his care, he has since revised his statement.He now says he committed 43 murders but denies five others. For the remaining 52 cases examined by the court, he says he cannot remember whether he “manipulated” his victims — his term for administering the ultimately deadly shots.“That leaves people in the dark — it doesn’t allow them to mourn,” Petra Klein of the Weisser Ring crime victims’ organization in Oldenburg told AFP.She described the legal proceedings as “trying” for the loved ones.Psychiatrist Max Steller told the court that while Hoegel bears responsibility for his acts, he suffers from a “severe narcissistic disorder.”He “is always fundamentally ready to lie if that allows him to put himself in a better light,” Steller said.The defendant claims, for example, not to remember his first victim, who died on February 7, 2000.However a serial killer never forgets his first victim, Steller asserted, “meaning that he probably ‘manipulated’ before that.”While former colleagues in Delmenhorst admitted to having had their suspicions about Hoegel, all the staff from Oldenburg who testified said they were oblivious to the body count stacking up on his watch.Buehrmann appeared exasperated by what he called this “collective amnesia.”Ten of the witnesses are now facing possible charges for perjury, according to a spokesman for the prosecution.Klein said that, at this point, the biggest hope of the victims’ families was that Hoegel “should never emerge from prison.”She said the idea that he would one day walk free — which is not inconceivable under the German justice system — would be “unbearable for many of them.”

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Thai official dismisses Muslim insurgent demand on detainees

NEW DELHI: Some Kashmir schools re-opened on Monday but were largely empty following weekend clashes in Srinagar, two-weeks after India removed the restive region’s autonomy and imposed a lockdown.The authorities said they were re-opening 190 primary schools in the city yet few children could be seen at half a dozen places visited by AFP.Pakistan meanwhile…

Thai official dismisses Muslim insurgent demand on detainees

NEW DELHI: Some Kashmir schools re-opened on Monday but were largely empty following weekend clashes in Srinagar, two-weeks after India removed the restive region’s autonomy and imposed a lockdown.The authorities said they were re-opening 190 primary schools in the city yet few children could be seen at half a dozen places visited by AFP.Pakistan meanwhile said Indian fire across their de-facto border on Sunday killed two civilians and seriously injured a child, a day after New Delhi said Pakistani fire killed an Indian soldier.India on August 5 ended the special constitutional status of Muslim-majority Kashmir, where a 30-year-old uprising against Indian rule has killed tens of thousands of people, mostly civilians.Hours before its move, India severely curtailed movement and shut down phones and the Internet, bringing in tens of thousands of troops to turn the main city of Srinagar into a fortress.Some 120,000 extra soldiers have been deployed, a security source told AFP, joining around 500,000 already in the northern Himalayan region divided with Pakistan since 1947.At least 4,000 people have also been detained under the Public Safety Act (PSA), which allows imprisonment for up to two years without charge or trial, government sources said.“Most of them were flown out of Kashmir because prisons here have run out of capacity,” a local magistrate told AFP, speaking on condition of anonymity.Authorities have declined to comment on the numbers of people behind bars. Those picked up include local politicians, activists, business leaders and lawyers.Officials said only that the “few preventive detentions” were made to avoid a “breach of the peace,” and that there was “no centralized figure” for the total number.On Sunday family members held a wake for timber trader Sidiq Khan, 62, who relatives said had died after suffocating from tear gas fired by security forces in Srinagar.A senior government official told AFP that a man in his mid-60s had died, and that a post-mortem “has not revealed any external or internal marks of injury.”After some easing in previous days, authorities on Sunday reinforced heavy restrictions after eight people were injured during protests.The Press Trust of India news agency cited unnamed officials saying there had been clashes in a dozen locations around Srinagar on Saturday.Around 20 percent of landlines were working on Monday, an AFP reporter said. But mobile phones and the Internet were still cut off.In Srinagar on Monday most main streets and markets were deserted, although some roads looked busier than in recent days.Some teachers and administrative staff made it to schools but many others didn’t. PTI also reported that only a handful of children had come.“We didn’t receive an official notification for re-opening the school from the local government but opened it after watching the news yesterday,” a senior official at Srinagar’s Burn Hall School told AFP.Many schools stayed shut, with guards at the gate turning away any teachers or administrative staff who turned up.“I don’t think parents will send their children to school if they can’t communicate and check on them whenever required,” a resident of the Rajbagh area of Srinagar told AFP outside the Presentation Convent School.“I came here after watching the news yesterday but it doesn’t look like any students have come to school today. There are many other teachers who stay farther away and haven’t made it here,” one of the teachers at a local school told AFP.

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Families grieve after Kabul wedding blast

KABUL: Mirwais Elmi’s special night soon became a bloodbath after a suicide bomber detonated explosives in the hotel hall where his wedding ceremony was taking place, killing more than 63 people and injuring 200 others in Kabul on Sunday. Elmi and his bride, who were in separate areas of the venue, survived the blast. The…

Families grieve after  Kabul wedding blast

KABUL: Mirwais Elmi’s special night soon became a bloodbath after a suicide bomber detonated explosives in the hotel hall where his wedding ceremony was taking place, killing more than 63 people and injuring 200 others in Kabul on Sunday. Elmi and his bride, who were in separate areas of the venue, survived the blast. The explosion took place just before dinner was to be served to the nearly 1,000 guests who had gathered in the southwest of the city.The local Daesh affiliate claimed responsibility for the attack Speaking to a private TV channel on Sunday, a shaken Elmi was unable to describe the carnage that took place.

“I am not a groom today, my family, my friends are all in grief,” Elmi, who is in his early 20s and works as a tailor, said.He added that he never thought “such an incident would happen during my wedding party.”As survivors buried victims of the attack, an infant’s milk bottle and an invitation card could be seen near one of the hotel’s walls, badly damaged by the blast.The attack comes as the US and Taliban close in on a peace deal which would lead to the complete withdrawal of foreign troops from Afghanistan, nearly 18 years after the Taliban were ousted. The group immediately distanced themselves from the attack and strongly condemned it.Elmi’s father-in-law lost 14 members of his family, while another man lost three of his sons, four nephews and five of his aunt’s grandchildren, according to survivor accounts.“My family and my bride are in shock, they cannot speak. My bride keeps fainting. I lost my brother, I lost my friends, I lost my relatives. I will never see happiness in my life again,” he said. All five members of the wedding’s music band were killed. The groom and bride’s families, like many of those attending the ceremony, belonged to poor families.  None of the guests were government officials sought by Daesh or other militant groups.

Government leaders live behind heavily protected compounds, drive in armored vehicles and have their families living abroad, but we ordinary Afghans are suffering routinely.

Ghulam Hussien Nasiri, Lawmaker

Many of the victims were children and young men. The hotel had no guards and guests were not body searched, according to survivors.Shi’ite cultural centers and an anti-government protest have all recently come under attack, but Sunday’s wedding blast was the first of its kind, evoking a reaction from President Ashraf Ghani. He blamed Daesh for the incident. “I strongly condemn the inhumane attack on the wedding hall in Kabul. My top priority for now is to reach out to the families of victims of this barbaric attack. On behalf of the nation, I send my heartfelt condolences to the families of those who were martyred. “The Taliban cannot absolve themselves of blame, for they provide a platform for terrorists,” he tweeted.Ghulam Hussien Nasiri, a lawmaker, said the attack exposed the government’s weakness.“Government leaders live behind heavily protected compounds, drive in armored vehicles and have their families living abroad, but we ordinary Afghans are suffering routinely,” he told Arab News.

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India reimposes movement curbs on parts of Kashmir’s main city after clashes

LONDON: UK’s Boris Johnson will visit European capitals this week on his first overseas trip as prime minister, as his government said Sunday it had ordered the scrapping of the decades-old law enforcing its EU membership. Johnson will travel to Berlin on Wednesday for talks with German Chancellor Angela Merkel and on to Paris Thursday…

India reimposes movement curbs on parts of Kashmir’s main city after clashes

LONDON: UK’s Boris Johnson will visit European capitals this week on his first overseas trip as prime minister, as his government said Sunday it had ordered the scrapping of the decades-old law enforcing its EU membership.

Johnson will travel to Berlin on Wednesday for talks with German Chancellor Angela Merkel and on to Paris Thursday for discussions with French President Emmanuel Macron, Downing Street confirmed on Sunday, amid growing fears of a no-deal Brexit in two and a half months.

The meetings, ahead of a two-day G7 summit starting Saturday in the southern French resort of Biarritz, are his first diplomatic forays abroad since replacing predecessor Theresa May last month.

Johnson is expected to push for the EU to reopen negotiations over the terms of Brexit or warn that it faces the prospect of Britain’s disorderly departure on October 31 — the date it is due to leave.

European leaders have repeatedly rejected reopening an accord agreed by May last year but then rejected by British lawmakers on three occasions, despite Johnson’s threats that the country will leave then without an agreement.

In an apparent show of intent, London announced Sunday that it had ordered the repeal of the European Communities Act, which took Britain into the forerunner to the EU 46 years ago and gives Brussels law supremacy.

The order, signed by Brexit Secretary Steve Barclay on Friday, is set to take effect on October 31.

“This is a landmark moment in taking back control of our laws from Brussels,” Barclay said in a statement.

“This is a clear signal to the people of this country that there is no turning back — we are leaving the EU as promised on October 31, whatever the circumstances — delivering on the instructions given to us in 2016.”

The moves come as Johnson faces increasing pressure to immediately recall MPs from their summer holidays so that parliament can debate Brexit.

More than 100 lawmakers, who are not due to return until September 3, have demanded in a letter that he reconvene the 650-seat House of Commons and let them sit permanently until October 31.

“Our country is on the brink of an economic crisis, as we career towards a no-deal Brexit,” said the letter, signed by MPs and opposition party leaders who want to halt a no-deal departure.

“We face a national emergency, and parliament must be recalled now.”

Parliament is set to break up again shortly after it returns, with the main parties holding their annual conferences during the September break.

Main opposition Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn wants to call a vote of no confidence in Johnson’s government after parliament returns.

He hopes to take over as a temporary prime minister, seek an extension to Britain’s EU departure date to stop a no-deal Brexit, and then call a general election.

“What we need is a government that is prepared to negotiate with the European Union so we don’t have a crash-out on the 31st,” Corbyn said Saturday.

“This government clearly doesn’t want to do that.”

Britain could face food, fuel and medicine shortages and chaos at its ports in a no-deal Brexit, The Sunday Times newspaper reported, citing a leaked government planning document.

There would likely be some form of hard border imposed on the island of Ireland, the document implied.

Rather than worst-case scenarios, the leaked document, compiled this month by the Cabinet Office ministry, spells out the likely ramifications of a no-deal Brexit, the broadsheet claimed.

The document said logjams could affect fuel distribution, while up to 85 percent of trucks using the main ports to continental Europe might not be ready for French customs.

The availability of fresh food would be diminished and prices would go up, the newspaper said.

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