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[dropcap]P[/dropcap]roin tristique elit et augue varius pellentesque. Donec enim neque, vulputate et commodo in, tristique sed velit. Phasellus adipiscing faucibus felis eget hendrerit. Vestibulum aliquet mauris sed felis convallis, sed tempus augue malesuada. Vivamus mauris lorem, laoreet sed suscipit nec, dapibus at elit. In in augue lobortis, eleifend tortor et, varius eros. Vivamus dignissim sed justo vitae suscipit. Mauris mi sem, malesuada sed sapien ut, sagittis condimentum urna. Nullam lacus mi, vulputate sed sollicitudin in, semper ut elit. Phasellus nec est at leo euismod placerat a porttitor est. Curabitur vel varius nunc, nec tincidunt magna. Proin eros mauris, lobortis id quam non, euismod fringilla nulla. Fusce vel nisi et turpis tempor molestie sit amet a dolor. [quote bcolor=”#e5e5e5″] quam eu nibh porttitor, vitae vestibulum turpis molestie. Sed quis mauris vitae dolor imperdiet pharetra. Sed et eros eget sapien tempor cursus sit amet eget eros. Nunc a mauris imperdiet, scelerisque diam laoreet, consequat nibh. Morbi gravida ornare sem, aliquet vehicula augue egestas eget. Sed mollis fringilla enim.[/quote] Vestibulum sit amet ante eget diam scelerisque eleifend. Nam metus mauris, cursus non suscipit ut, faucibu[highlight]s ut quam. Quisque ac scelerisque dolor. Nam sapien leo[/highlight], euismod id elementum ut, dapibus eget elit. Nunc posuere porttitor nulla facilisis congue. Maecenas molestie quam eu nibh porttitor, vitae vestibulum turpis molestie. Sed quis mauris vitae dolor imperdiet pharetra. Sed et eros eget sapien tempor cursus sit amet eget eros. Nunc a mauris imperdiet, scelerisque diam laoreet, consequat nibh. Morbi gravida ornare sem, aliquet vehicula augue egestas eget. Sed mollis fringilla enim, ac accumsan metus porta et. Fusce ut lacinia ante, et pretium velit. Nullam eget metus enim. Vestibulum mollis leo in nulla tristique, sit amet tincidunt nibh tincidunt. Cras at sem at leo pretium bibendum et at nisl. Pellentesque odio enim, consectetur vitae commodo non, facilisis tincidunt justo.

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Duis tortor metus, accumsan in elit eget, porttitor sollicitudin ante. Sed in nunc sem. Ut tincidunt libero sed tortor vulputate, sit amet interdum urna eleifend. Ut porta justo a mauris aliquam tincidunt. Maecenas faucibus ultrices mauris ac lacinia. Maecenas eget urna leo. Maecenas congue mauris erat, in eleifend ante eleifend quis. In quis leo sit amet nibh imperdiet dignissim. Morbi malesuada luctus tortor, id cursus diam venenatis non. Nulla sit amet dui metus. Ut at interdum ipsum, ac ornare lacus. Etiam rutrum magna diam, sed luctus risus consectetur at. Vestibulum sodales purus eget consectetur tincidunt. Praesent augue nisl, consectetur a leo vel, vehicula dapibus nibh. [one_third][list list_items=”list item,list item,list item,list item,list item” icon=”fa-icon-ok” icon_color=”#92ca1a”][/one_third] [one_third][list list_items=”list item,list item,list item,list item,list item” icon=”fa-icon-remove” icon_color=”#de5b5b”][/one_third] [one_third_last][list list_items=”list item,list item,list item,list item,list item” icon=”fa-icon-cog” icon_color=”#5ba5de”][/one_third_last] [gap height=”20″]

Last Name First Name Email Due Web Site
Smith John jsmith@gmail.com $50.00 http://www.jsmith.com
Bach Frank fbach@yahoo.com $50.00 http://www.frank.com
Doe Jason jdoe@hotmail.com $100.00 http://www.jdoe.com
Conway Tim tconway@earthlink.net $50.00 http://www.tway.com

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Middle East News

Water-scarce Gulf states bank on desalination, at a cost

DUBAI: The date palm, which was recognized by UNESCO on Wednesday, has for centuries played an important role in the establishment and growth of civilizations in the hot and dry regions of the Arab world.Now date palm-related knowledge, traditions and practices have been inscribed on UNESCO’s list of Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity.The tree, whose…

Water-scarce Gulf states bank on desalination, at a cost

DUBAI: The date palm, which was recognized by UNESCO on Wednesday, has for centuries played an important role in the establishment and growth of civilizations in the hot and dry regions of the Arab world.Now date palm-related knowledge, traditions and practices have been inscribed on UNESCO’s list of Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity.The tree, whose roots penetrate deep into the soil, allowing it to grow in arid climates, has not only been a source of food but also of economic gain.“Date palms gather in oases of different densities within desert areas indicating the presence of water levels suitable for irrigation,” according to a nomination put forward by 14 countries — Bahrain, Egypt, Iraq, Jordan, Kuwait, Mauritania, Morocco, Oman, Palestinian Territories, Saudi Arabia, Sudan, Tunisia, United Arab Emirates and Yemen.“As a result, this aided mankind in settling down despite harsh conditions,” said the document.Until this day, platters of dates adorn tables in homes and businesses across the Arab world, where the symbol of the date palm tree has historically presented prosperity.The offering of the sweet fruit, coupled with a cup of coffee, is a sign of good old-fashioned Arab hospitality.According to the UN’s Food and Agriculture Organization, the date palm is probably the most ancient cultivated tree.It was grown as early as 4,000 BC and used for the construction of the moon god temple near Ur in southern Iraq — the ancient region of Mesopotamia.“The population of the submitting states has been associated with the date palm tree for centuries as it aided them in the construction of civilization,” they said in the nomination.“Historical research and various antiquities excavations have resulted in the plant’s significant cultural and economic status in numerous regions such as Mesopotamia, ancient Egypt and the Arab Gulf.”The ancient crop also faces some modern challenges. Gulf countries have fought hard to eradicate the red palm weevil, which originally came from Asia and was first detected in the region in the 1980s.The beetle, which is barely a few centimeters (around an inch) long, produces larvae that feed off palm trunks, killing the trees.“In Gulf countries and the Middle East, $8 million is lost each year through removal of severely infested trees alone,” according to the FAO.All parts of the date palm were and are still used in some parts of the region for shelter or to produce a range of products, including handicrafts, mats, rope and furniture.To celebrate and promote their date palm heritage and palm products, some of the submitting countries hold annual date festivals, most notably the annual Liwa Date Festival in the UAE and the Dates Festival in Al-Qassim in Saudi Arabia.Both Gulf countries are among the top date exporters, according to the Geneva-based International Trade Center.

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Middle East News

Date palm, Arab region symbol of prosperity, listed by UNESCO

SUR, OMAN: “We have water, and it’s the most important thing in a house,” says Abdullah Al-Harthi from the port city of Sur in Oman, a country that relies on desalination plants.But for Oman and the other Gulf countries dominated by vast and scorching deserts, obtaining fresh water from the sea comes at a high…

Date palm, Arab region symbol of prosperity, listed by UNESCO

SUR, OMAN: “We have water, and it’s the most important thing in a house,” says Abdullah Al-Harthi from the port city of Sur in Oman, a country that relies on desalination plants.But for Oman and the other Gulf countries dominated by vast and scorching deserts, obtaining fresh water from the sea comes at a high financial and environmental cost.In Sur, south of the capital Muscat, water for residents and businesses comes from a large desalination plant that serves some 600,000 people.“Before, life was very difficult. We had wells, and water was delivered by trucks,” the 58-year-old told AFP. “Since the 1990s, water has come through pipes and we’ve had no cuts.”But these benefits — relying on energy intensive processes that produce carbon emissions — do not come without a cost, particularly as global temperatures rise.The United Nations says 2019 is on course to be one of the hottest three years on record.And there is another impact: the desalination plants produce highly concentrated salt water, or brine, that is often dumped back into the ocean.Researchers say more than 16,000 desalination plants around the globe produce more toxic sludge than freshwater.For every liter of freshwater extracted from the sea or brackish water, a liter-and-a-half of salty slurry is deposed at sea or on land, according to a 2019 study in the journal Science.All that extra salt raises the temperature of coastal waters and decreases the level of oxygen, which can conspire to create biological “dead zones.”The super-salty substance is made even more toxic by the chemicals used in the desalination process.Oman’s bigger neighbors produce the bulk of the brine.More than half comes from just four countries — Saudi Arabia, at 22 percent, United Arab Emirates with 20 percent, and smaller shares by Kuwait and Qatar, according to UN data.“Brine production in Saudi Arabia, UAE, Kuwait and Qatar accounts for 55 percent of the total global share,” according to the United Nations University Institute for Water, Environment and Health.It said new strategies are needed “to limit the negative environmental impacts and reduce the economic cost of disposal.”This would help “to safeguard water supplies for current and future generations.”At the Sur plant, “almost no chemicals” are used during the pre-treatment phase, as the water is naturally filtered through the cracks of karst rocks, said Mahendran Senapathy, operations manager at French company Veolia which runs the plant along with an Omani firm.There are other ways to safeguard freshwater supplies, from encouraging savings and efficiently to recycling wastewater.Antoine Frerot, chief executive of Veolia, said wastewater recycling will help resolve the problem of water scarcity.He also pointed out that “reused water is less costly,” nearly one third less than that won through desalination.Omani authorities continue to mount campaigns urging people to use water wisely, mindful that other demands — especially the energy sector — also guzzle up large amounts.Across the Gulf, huge amounts of water are used not just for homes, gardens and golf courses, but also for the energy sector that is the source of the region’s often spectacular wealth.On the edge of the Arabian peninsula’s “Empty Quarter,” the world’s largest expanse of sand, lies the Khazzan gas field, operated by BP and the Oman Oil Company.The method used to extract the gas here is hydraulic fracturing — more commonly known as fracking — said Stewart Robertson, operations manager at the site.The method requires huge amounts of water. The site is supplied by a facility that provides 6,000 cubic meters of water a day, extracted from an underground aquifer 50 kilometers (30 miles) away.Fracking involves directional drilling and then pumping water, sand and chemicals at high pressure to fracture rock and release the hydrocarbons.The rock formations that hold the gas are “like a big sponge with lots of little holes in it,” said Robertson, explaining that fracking is the process “to open those holes slightly to take the gas out.”So the more the region extracts oil and natural or shale gas, “the more they need water,” said Charles Iceland of the World Resources Institute.“The Middle East is projected to need more and more energy,” he said. “So that means the situation is going to get worse.”“On the other hand,” he said, “if they can produce power using solar photovoltaic technologies, which are getting reasonably priced in the Middle East, that would take care of a lot of the problem because solar PV doesn’t need much water.“You need just some water to clean the solar panels.”

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Latest News

Job vacancies in Dubai government; apply here

Inviting enthusiastic job-seekers to join The Future Team of the Dubai Museum. Dubai Future Foundation has posted three job openings in the field of guest relations, sales and marketing and social media at Dubai Museum. Inviting enthusiastic job-seekers to join The Future Team of the Dubai Museum which is one-of-its-kind spectacular building Sheikh Zayed Road. 1.) Guest relations A guest…

Job vacancies in Dubai government; apply here

Inviting enthusiastic job-seekers to join The Future Team of the Dubai Museum.

Dubai Future Foundation has posted three job openings in the field of guest relations, sales and marketing and social media at Dubai Museum. Inviting enthusiastic job-seekers to join The Future Team of the Dubai Museum which is one-of-its-kind spectacular building Sheikh Zayed Road.

1.) Guest relations

A guest relations team member will work at the Museum of The Future and ensure guests receive an immersive, personalized and memorable experience from the future. The selected candidates will work to support the Guest Services team to deliver exceptional visitor service from the visitor’s initial contact, to arrival at the building, museum admission, experience through the exhibits, right through to departure.

Skills: Applicants should at least hold a Diploma in hospitality or relevant fields and have experience in Guest Relations in the hospitality or entertainment industry. An excellent command of English is mandatory but any additional languages are an added advantage.

2.) Retail

A retail team member will be a guardian of the Retail Store visitors’ experience and will support the achievement of retail sales. The selected candidates will work to support the Retail Management team in the delivery of a world class visitors’ experience, through effective and proactive sales and services.

They will support the management in all logistical matters related to the visitors’ experience, including orientation, monitoring and addressing visitors’ issues and concerns during their visits to the Retail Store.

Skills: An excellent command of English is mandatory while any other languages are an additional advantage. Besides this, the applicants must at the least possess a Diploma and a previous experience in retail sales in a similar industry.

3.) Social Media Manager

Social Media Manager will report directly to the Director – Marketing and Communications and will be a part of the Marketing Department Team for the Museum of the Future. The selected candidate will contribute in spreading an enthusiastic vision for the museum and for the future more broadly, developing interest and excitement in the community, with partners and other stakeholders.

Skills: The selected candidate should have at lease 8 years of experience in managing social media for global brands with progressive responsibility in Marketing, Communications or PR roles in an agency environment. A Bachelor or Master degree in Marketing, Communications, journalism, PR or a related field is also required. Further, the job entails working flexible and irregular hours to support marketing events and activities.

For further details log on to https://careers.dubaifuture.gov.ae/en/

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